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Questions and answers about sports

Pain at the back of the left Knee?

4 min read

Asked by: Jenny Evans

Two common conditions that cause pain behind the knee are a posterior cruciate ligament injury and a popliteal cyst (Baker’s cyst).

What causes pain behind the knee back of leg?

Some of the most common causes of pain behind the knee (posterior knee pain) include, Baker’s cyst, arthritis, infection, injury, tumor, or deep vein thrombosis.

Is it normal for the back of your knee to hurt?

The back of the knee may hurt when a person straightens their leg because of a variety of issues, including blood clots, muscle or tendon injuries, arthritis, or cysts. Physical therapy, rest, and pain medications are common treatments for many of these causes, but sometimes a person will need surgery treat the issue.

How do you treat knee pain behind the knee?

Tips for quick relief

  1. Rest the knee until it heals.
  2. Hold ice on it for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day.
  3. Wear a compression bandage to support the knee, but make sure it’s not too tight.
  4. Elevate the injured knee on a pillow or several pillows.
  5. Use crutches or a cane to take weight off the knee.

Is pain behind knee a blood clot?

The popliteal vein runs behind the knee and transports blood back up to the heart. When a blood clot forms in this vein, doctors refer to it as popliteal vein thrombosis. Symptoms include pain, swelling, and redness in the leg and knee area.

How do I know if my knee pain is serious?

Call your doctor if you:

  1. Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable or gives out.
  2. Have marked knee swelling.
  3. Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee.
  4. See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee.
  5. Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee.

What’s the backside of your knee called?

The shallow depression formed at the back of the knee is called the popliteal fossa; it is formed at the junction of the femur and tibia. There is a muscle here on the floor of the popliteal fossa which is the deepest muscle of the knee joint.

How do u know if u have a Baker’s cyst?

In some cases, a Baker’s cyst causes no pain, and you may not notice it.
If you do have signs and symptoms, they might include:

  1. Swelling behind your knee, and sometimes in your leg.
  2. Knee pain.
  3. Stiffness and inability to fully flex the knee.

What is behind knee called?

The Popliteal Fossa is a diamond-shaped space behind the knee joint. It is formed between the muscles in the posterior compartments of the thigh and leg. This anatomical landmark is the major route by which structures pass between the thigh and leg.

What are the 10 signs of a blood clot?

This is dangerous, so look out for these symptoms:

  • Pain in the side of your belly, legs, or thighs.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Fever.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Sudden severe leg swelling.
  • Trouble breathing.

What does a blood clot in the back of the knee feel like?

While the vein is closer to the surface of the skin in the back of the knee, a clot can form anywhere in the blood vessel. The skin over the affected area may also feel warm to the touch. The pain, which can start in the lower leg, may feel like a cramp.

What are the first signs of a blood clot?

Symptoms of a blood clot include:

  • throbbing or cramping pain, swelling, redness and warmth in a leg or arm.
  • sudden breathlessness, sharp chest pain (may be worse when you breathe in) and a cough or coughing up blood.

How do you check for blood clots in legs at home?

DVT Symptoms To Be Aware Of

  1. Swelling in one or both legs.
  2. Changes in the color of the affected leg – typically to a blue or purple shade.
  3. A warm feeling of the skin on the affected limb.
  4. Leg tenderness or pain.
  5. Tired or restless leg that doesn’t appear to go away.
  6. Reddening or discoloration of the skin on the leg.

What does leg clot feel like?

Signs that you may have a blood clot
leg pain or discomfort that may feel like a pulled muscle, tightness, cramping or soreness. swelling in the affected leg. redness or discoloration of the sore spot. the affected area feeling warm to the touch.