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Is this cassette and chain ring combination good in terms of number of teeth?

5 min read

Asked by: Jillian Pratt

What is the best chainring cassette combination?

Standard Setup. Currently, the most common gearing setup on new road bikes is a 50/34 chainset with an 11-28 cassette. This means that the big and small chainring have 50 and 34 teeth, respectively, and the cassette’s smallest cog has 11 teeth and its largest cog has 28 teeth.

How many teeth should my chain ring have?

There’s no universal correct number of teeth for the largest chainring. For MTB triples 42 teeth is common, while road triples usually have 50 to 53 teeth.

How do I choose chainring size?

The larger chainring gives you bigger, harder to turn gears that move you further per pedal revolution – so it’s suitable for higher speeds – while the smaller chainring gives you gears that are easier to turn but move you a shorter distance per pedal revolution – so it’s suitable for lower speeds, including riding

What do chainring numbers mean?

The numbers on the chainrings simply refer to the number of teeth on each chainring. A standard crankset will have the 53 and 39 tooth rings (obviously the 53 tooth ring is the large one and the 39 tooth one is the small one), while a compact crankset typically has 50 and 34 tooth rings.

Is 11/32 cassette Good for hills?

For hill climbing and mountainous terrain, we recommend a road cassette such as the 11-32T SRAM Red 22 XG1190 11 Speed Cassette (A2), or the 11-34T Shimano Ultegra R8000 11 Speed Cassette.

How much difference does 2 teeth on chainring make?

In this size range two teeth in the front is about the same as one tooth in the back. It’s a very small change but sometimes it’s just that small difference that tips the scale in your favour.

Is an 11 34 cassette good for climbing?

All other things being equal, the 34T sprocket on the 11-34T cassette is going to give you the easiest gear. If your bike is currently fitted with an 11-28T cassette, switching to an 11-34T cassette will make climbing less of a struggle.

How many teeth does a cassette have?

In general, cassettes start at 10, 11 or 12 teeth. Again, there are exceptions, with options available with 9-, 13- or 14-tooth smallest sprockets. You may sometimes see brands refer to their cassettes as having a certain range in the form of a percentage.

Which cassette ratio is best for climbing?

Here’s the short answer:

  • The best mountain bike gear ratio for climbing is 46 to 49 on a chainring and 16 to 18 on a cassette. …
  • These can consist of chains, front/rear shifters, cassettes, front/rear derailleurs, and chainrings.

Is a 11/28 cassette Good for hills?

When you have built up your leg muscles and are powering up most hills, swap a lower range cassette, such as an 11-28, back in. You don’t need to do this if you are a frequent cyclist, young, with strong legs, fitter than average, or if you live in a flat place with no hills.

What is the best chainring for climbing?

Mountain bike chainrings are available in smaller sizes all the way down to 26t, though I’d recommend most riders try a 30t or 28t first to experience how much easier it is to climb. For gravel bikes, I wouldn’t recommend going any smaller than 38t to maintain top-end speed on downhills.

Does the number of teeth on a cassette matter?


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Is an 11 34 cassette good for climbing?

All other things being equal, the 34T sprocket on the 11-34T cassette is going to give you the easiest gear. If your bike is currently fitted with an 11-28T cassette, switching to an 11-34T cassette will make climbing less of a struggle.

How do you match a chain and cassette ring?

In general, cassettes, chains and chainrings are compatible with each other across manufacturers. You just have to make sure you select a chain and chainrings that are compatible with the number of sprockets in the cassette. The number of rings on the crank does not matter.

How do you know if a chainring is compatible?

One of the easiest ways to determine which chainring is going to be compatible with your crank is to simply type in your brand, type, groupset, and type, added with “chainring”, and possible the amount of teeth you want. You can find the type of the crank located at the back of it.

Are smaller chainrings better?

The size of a chainring (often expressed in terms of the amount of teeth on it, e.g. a 53t ring) plays a direct role in your bike’s gearing, with bigger rings meaning a higher (harder to push) gear and smaller rings a lower (easier to push) gear.

Does a bigger chain ring make you go faster?

Will you go faster if you replace the stock chainring on your bike, like the 50t one shown here, with a larger chainring, like the 56t behind it? 99% of the time the answer is no, you will likely go slower.

Which is better round or oval chainring?

As a direct consequence, Oval rings enhance a cyclist’s ability to spin with a smoother power delivery and feel much easier on legs while climbing. Meaning you will go faster and get less tired. You will actually feel your pedal stroke to be more “round” with an Oval chainring than with a round chainring.